Category Archives for Physical Education

How to Deal with Reluctant Students and Refusal to Participate

Fear in children isn’t always expressed with wide-eyes and tears, particularly with older teens. In school, fear of failure at an activity or standing out in a bad way can manifest as refusals to participate.

When faced with a child or teenager’s refusal to participate, it can be tough, but these are children feeling fear. It’s up to you to role model bravery and provide safety.

Source of Fears
Not every child in a PE or After School Program is an expert in sports, so some may struggle to learn. For them, aiming at the net in basketball but throwing an air ball in front of everyone may feel humiliating.

From dribbling the ball right to remembering the rules, these children see nothing but opportunities to fail when playing basketball. So, they avoid it all together; they refuse to participate.

What Can You Do?
When someone is feeling fear, it’s like they are backed into a corner. Pushing them will only cause them to feel further penned in with no choice other than digging in deeper. It’s time to be creative and show them a way out of the corner.

1.Don’t Fight Them. They will seem angry and obstinate, but remember, they are scared. Don’t fuel the fires of their anger. Show them bravery by staying calm in the face of their adversity.

2.Acknowledge Their Choice. Give permission to skip the game. Tell them you understand they don’t want to play, so let’s do something else that’s less threatening and helps build self-esteem instead of tear it down.

3.Redirect the Energy. Introduce fun games and activities that focus on skill development, like Basketball Skillastics®. Pull from these to give them small challenges that they can win. Focus on the skill, not the game

Making it Fun for All
When you push someone out of their comfort zone, it helps to provide a bridge. That’s where skill development come into the picture. Not everyone will be able to play a game of basketball, but skill development is accessible to everyone.

One of the reasons Basketball Skillastics® works well with a diverse group is because its inclusive and allows a whole class to practice their skills in a fun way all at the same time. Also, you can float the room once everyone is occupied. Now, you can assess everyone’s skill level, provide more support for reluctant students, and allow skilled students to showcase their abilities.
Bridging the Gulf

Develop resources to bridge the gulf to reach and draw out fearful students; you have a real chance to help change their attitudes. We can get you started with Basketball Skillastics®, a resource designed so that all children can have fun learning basketball instead of missing out. Throughout November when you use the code bb2019, you’ll receive 10% off so that you can begin to use this resource right away. Purchase online or via Purchase Order to FAX (951) 279-3957 or email to Suzanne Blair at sblair@sandyspinslade.com

5 Tips for Creating Basketball Lesson that Kids Love

It’s that time of year again! Gyms echo with the squeaks of sneakers as we kick off Basketball Season. During PE and after school this time of year, it’s all about basketball. It’s also the number one choice of recess activity; more basketballs are requested this time of year, and for good reason!

Everyone can play with a ball. But not everyone can or wants to play a sport.

Basketball for All
So, it’s tough to create lessons to teach basketball; how do you include students who are good at basketball and want to be challenged as well as students who have very little interest in the sport?

The solution is to focus on skill development. All students, no matter their ability, can have fun developing their skills in a non-threatening, non-competitive atmosphere.
Creating the Right Environment

By following the 5 tips below, you can make it easier to teach basketball fundamentals to diverse groups:

1.A Ball for Each. Get each student a ball, any ball. If it bounces and fits through a net, it’s great to use to teach basketball fundamentals. If you must share, follow a ratio of two students per ball.

2.Control the Bouncing. Kids love to bounce the ball! They can’t seem to help themselves, despite requests to stop, and it gets disruptive. So, remove temptation. Create a signal word or phrase like “stall the ball!” at which they put the ball between their feet when they hear it.

3.Delegate to Motivate and Engage. If you’re not comfortable demonstrating a fundamental, allow skilled students to take this role. They will love it!

4.Keep Them Moving! Downtime breeds distractions or misbehaving. Keep them actively engaged. Waiting in line? Practice dribbling or ball-handling. Waiting for a ball? Mirror the activity to learn the motions.

5.Play the Game Last. At the end of the lesson, avoid playing a game of basketball. Modify the game to highlight the skill learned in the session.

Resource for Skill Building
To modify the game or learn other skill development ideas so all children enjoy the sport, consult resources like Basketball Skillastics®. Motivated by the desire to create an all-inclusive and whole class learning environment, Basketball Skillastics was designed to practice skills in a fun way together.

For this month, let’s make the most of the sport by getting the most children involved through skill development. Celebrate the start of basketball season with a 10% discount on Basketball Skillastics® throughout November for After School and Physical Education Instructors with code bb2019. Online, or Purchase Order. https://skillastics.com/product/basketball-skillastics/

Custom Card Download for STEM

Custom Card Download for STEM

How would you like to integrate classroom teachers lessons into your program? Our STEM Custom Card Download makes it easy. Here is how it works. 

1) Ask a classroom teacher if they wouldn’t mind including questions on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math in your program.

2) Provide them the STEM Custom Card Download Template

3) The classroom teacher would type his/her questions into the template and email it back to you when completed.

4) You would print the template, laminate it, and add the cards to the already existing question cards that are included with STEM Skillastics®.

5) You have now included real-time questions that classroom teachers are reviewing in the classroom into PE. The classroom teacher will be thrilled and you will love seamlessly integrating more academics into your program.

For more information, contact Jess Wadleigh at jwadleigh@skillastics.com or at (310) 431-8205.

Making Free Throws Count

Think about how many games are won or lost on the free throw line. It happens at all levels – Elementary, Jr. High, High School, College and the Pros. Developing a consistent, reliable foul shot can change your success and your team’s success. With all the physical contact that happens during a game, it’s wonderful to take a shot with no one guarding you. You work hard to get to the free throw line, now just put it in!
Things to remember:
• Take deep breaths; relax your muscles. Take a moment to catch your breath. You rarely go to the line rested.
• Repetition is important. Create a habit every time you step up to the free throw line. For example, dribble twice before you take the shot. Do the same routine every time. It will be comforting.
• Use a consistent shooting technique; each shot must be the same motion. Stay balanced. Keep your elbow in. Fix your eyes on the target and follow through.
• Line up properly. Most indoor courts have a nail placed in the middle of the foul line. Line up your right foot with the nail if you’re right-handed, left foot if you’re left-handed.
• Think positively; you must believe in yourself and have the confidence that you will make the shot. Repetition equals confidence; confidence equals success. Practice, practice, practice.
Drills:
1. Shoot at least 100 free throws a day.
2. Step up to the foul line and shoot two at a time. Step back off and the line for a split second. Then, shoot two more free throws.
3. Break up your shooting so you don’t get into a groove. Make 10 jump shots around the basket and then step up to the line and shoot 10 free throws. Repeat.
4. My Dad always told me to challenge myself when shooting free throws. If the ball swishes without touching the rim, it counts. If it touches the rim a little, but still goes in, it does not count. You don’t have to do this at first, but work toward this.
5. Keep a record of the shots you make each day.
Free throws are a very important part of the game. Practice shooting free throws so that you have the confidence to step up to that line during a crucial part of the game and put them in.

It’s Time to Celebrate “Big “Feats”

May: National Physical Fitness & Sports Month is the perfect time to celebrate effective physical education and sport programs – and shine a spotlight on SHAPE America’s members for their individual “feats” of accomplishment. On SHAPE America’s special May website we are proud to share their individual achievements and success stories. By learning from one another, the entire profession will thrive, and our voice will only get stronger.
Visit SHAPE America’s website where we encourage you to:
1. Download new activity ideas and lesson plans, as well as assessments from the newly released PE Metrics;
2. Get inspired by success stories from the profession;
3. Share #BigFeats with the world on social media;
4. Sign up to be a SHAPE America advocate for active and healthy students!
#BigFeats in Advocacy
Have you heard the exciting news? New federal legislation includes $1.1 billion in FY18 funding for Title IV, Part A of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). That’s $700 million more than last year! Learn what this could mean for health and physical education programs in your school by listening to the recorded ESSA Webinar on SHAPE America’s Online Institute.
With health and physical education listed as priorities under this ESSA block grant, local advocacy over the upcoming months about how this funding is spent — as well as funding for Titles I & II — will be critical. In this webinar, Carly Wright, Director, Public Policy & Advocacy, SHAPE America; Jamie Sparks, President-Elect, SHAPE America, and Karen Johnson Advocacy Consultant, SHAPE America, identify key themes in ESSA for health and physical education, highlight important timelines for implementation and offer the critical “next steps” all advocates and teachers must take to leverage this opportunity in schools.
Also be sure to visit SHAPE America’s Legislative Advocacy Center for access to how much money your school district will be getting in ESSA funding and new resources to help you make your ESSA funding request.

Rock Your Administrative Review!

What activity will I do for my administrative review”, is a question we all have asked ourselves. Administrators are looking for an all-inclusive, fully engaged resource that integrates social and emotional learning and academic integration. Easy, right!?!
Based upon feedback from over 100 Physical Education Specialists, this resource ALWAYS provides a stellar review. READ MORE
STEM Skillastics®. According to extensive feedback, STEM Skillastics® ties in everything your administrator wants to see. Every student is fully engaged and is experiencing a physical activity that highlights individual strengths while simultaneously integrating science, technology, engineering, and math knowledge.

Take the time to learn about STEM Skillastics®®. It might be that easy-to-implement activity that you’ve been looking for to bring additional value to your program.

Family Fitness Fun!

Skillastics® is the perfect large group physical activity resource to incorporate into your Family Fitness Event. Here is a Family Fitness Guide that will provide you step by step instructions on how to host a successful Family Fitness Event!

CLICK HERE for Family Fitness Guide

Strategies for Recess

Arizona is the latest state to pass a robust school recess mandate, calling for an equitable two-recess/day minimum standard for students in Kindergarten through 5th grade. According to recess advocates, this marks a reversal of unhealthy practices that developed around high stakes testing and No Child Left Behind, in favor of a return to educating the whole child.
SHAPE America – Society of Health and Physical Educators and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourage other states to do the same. To get started, they advise using step-by-step guidance and evidence-based strategies to support school recess for all K-12 students and enhance active school environments. The two guidance documents, Strategies for Recess in Schools and Recess Planning in Schools: A Guide to Putting Strategies for Recess Into Practice, can be downloaded free of charge at: shapeamerica.org/recess.
The guidance documents provide a blueprint for schools to use in implementing successful recess programs for their students. They are designed for state and school district leaders who provide technical assistance and professional development on recess, as well as classroom teachers, recess and playground supervisors, support staff, school administrators, parent-teacher organizations, school health coordinators, advisory councils, parents and anyone interested in supporting recess in schools.
Strategies for Recess in Schools defines recess and identifies 19 evidence-based strategies schools can implement that increase student physical activity and academic achievement. Although most of the evidence and expert opinion for these strategies came from elementary schools, many of the strategies are also applicable to secondary schools. The intent is for school staff or groups working with schools to identify what is currently happening or not happening with recess in their school, and then use this information to develop a recess plan that serves all students.
Recess Planning in Schools: A Guide to Putting Strategies for Recess Into Practice complements the strategies document by guiding schools through the process of developing a written recess plan that incorporates the identified strategies. In addition, CDC and SHAPE America developed a customizable Recess Planning Template, which enables schools to record details of how they will organize and implement recess at school.
By diving into each of the five broad categories included in the Strategies for Recess in Schools document, school staff or committees will be able to answer specific questions which will help them examine and enhance an existing recess program, or develop a new recess plan for a school.
Download the two new guidance documents, Strategies for Recess in Schools and Recess Planning in Schools: A Guide to Putting Strategies for Recess Into Practice, free of charge at: shapeamerica.org/recess.

Purchase Speed Stacks Skillastics® TODAY!

Skillastics® & Speed Stacks have joined forces to provide the perfect compliment to your Sport Stacking program!

​The Speed Stacks Skillastics® Activity Kit System lets you teach Sport Stacking using the proven and celebrated Skillastics® method.

The 26 Speed Stack activities reinforce all the skills and knowledge your students need to particpate in this amazing sport while enhancing physical activity, brain development and FUN!

Speed Stacks Skillastics® is NOW available for purchase as a pre-release special price sale!

Take advantage of this amazing price today, and then be one of the first to introduce Speed Stacks Skillastics® into your program in the Fall!

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND ORDER FORM

 

Introducing Speed Stacks Skillastics®!

Skillastics® & Speed Stacks Join Forces Announcing Powerful Physical Activity Resource

Introducing Speed Stacks Skillastics®! The newest Skillastics® Activity Kit that offers the best of both worlds by teaching Sport Stacking through the proven Skillastics® method.

The new Speed Stacks Skillastics® Activity Kit is launching next week at SHAPE America’s National Convention.

CLICK HERE for PRESS RELEASE

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