Category Archives for Afterschool

How to Deal with Reluctant Students and Refusal to Participate

Fear in children isn’t always expressed with wide-eyes and tears, particularly with older teens. In school, fear of failure at an activity or standing out in a bad way can manifest as refusals to participate.

When faced with a child or teenager’s refusal to participate, it can be tough, but these are children feeling fear. It’s up to you to role model bravery and provide safety.

Source of Fears
Not every child in a PE or After School Program is an expert in sports, so some may struggle to learn. For them, aiming at the net in basketball but throwing an air ball in front of everyone may feel humiliating.

From dribbling the ball right to remembering the rules, these children see nothing but opportunities to fail when playing basketball. So, they avoid it all together; they refuse to participate.

What Can You Do?
When someone is feeling fear, it’s like they are backed into a corner. Pushing them will only cause them to feel further penned in with no choice other than digging in deeper. It’s time to be creative and show them a way out of the corner.

1.Don’t Fight Them. They will seem angry and obstinate, but remember, they are scared. Don’t fuel the fires of their anger. Show them bravery by staying calm in the face of their adversity.

2.Acknowledge Their Choice. Give permission to skip the game. Tell them you understand they don’t want to play, so let’s do something else that’s less threatening and helps build self-esteem instead of tear it down.

3.Redirect the Energy. Introduce fun games and activities that focus on skill development, like Basketball Skillastics®. Pull from these to give them small challenges that they can win. Focus on the skill, not the game

Making it Fun for All
When you push someone out of their comfort zone, it helps to provide a bridge. That’s where skill development come into the picture. Not everyone will be able to play a game of basketball, but skill development is accessible to everyone.

One of the reasons Basketball Skillastics® works well with a diverse group is because its inclusive and allows a whole class to practice their skills in a fun way all at the same time. Also, you can float the room once everyone is occupied. Now, you can assess everyone’s skill level, provide more support for reluctant students, and allow skilled students to showcase their abilities.
Bridging the Gulf

Develop resources to bridge the gulf to reach and draw out fearful students; you have a real chance to help change their attitudes. We can get you started with Basketball Skillastics®, a resource designed so that all children can have fun learning basketball instead of missing out. Throughout November when you use the code bb2019, you’ll receive 10% off so that you can begin to use this resource right away. Purchase online or via Purchase Order to FAX (951) 279-3957 or email to Suzanne Blair at sblair@sandyspinslade.com

5 Tips for Creating Basketball Lesson that Kids Love

It’s that time of year again! Gyms echo with the squeaks of sneakers as we kick off Basketball Season. During PE and after school this time of year, it’s all about basketball. It’s also the number one choice of recess activity; more basketballs are requested this time of year, and for good reason!

Everyone can play with a ball. But not everyone can or wants to play a sport.

Basketball for All
So, it’s tough to create lessons to teach basketball; how do you include students who are good at basketball and want to be challenged as well as students who have very little interest in the sport?

The solution is to focus on skill development. All students, no matter their ability, can have fun developing their skills in a non-threatening, non-competitive atmosphere.
Creating the Right Environment

By following the 5 tips below, you can make it easier to teach basketball fundamentals to diverse groups:

1.A Ball for Each. Get each student a ball, any ball. If it bounces and fits through a net, it’s great to use to teach basketball fundamentals. If you must share, follow a ratio of two students per ball.

2.Control the Bouncing. Kids love to bounce the ball! They can’t seem to help themselves, despite requests to stop, and it gets disruptive. So, remove temptation. Create a signal word or phrase like “stall the ball!” at which they put the ball between their feet when they hear it.

3.Delegate to Motivate and Engage. If you’re not comfortable demonstrating a fundamental, allow skilled students to take this role. They will love it!

4.Keep Them Moving! Downtime breeds distractions or misbehaving. Keep them actively engaged. Waiting in line? Practice dribbling or ball-handling. Waiting for a ball? Mirror the activity to learn the motions.

5.Play the Game Last. At the end of the lesson, avoid playing a game of basketball. Modify the game to highlight the skill learned in the session.

Resource for Skill Building
To modify the game or learn other skill development ideas so all children enjoy the sport, consult resources like Basketball Skillastics®. Motivated by the desire to create an all-inclusive and whole class learning environment, Basketball Skillastics was designed to practice skills in a fun way together.

For this month, let’s make the most of the sport by getting the most children involved through skill development. Celebrate the start of basketball season with a 10% discount on Basketball Skillastics® throughout November for After School and Physical Education Instructors with code bb2019. Online, or Purchase Order. https://skillastics.com/product/basketball-skillastics/

Custom Card Download for STEM

Custom Card Download for STEM

How would you like to integrate classroom teachers lessons into your program? Our STEM Custom Card Download makes it easy. Here is how it works. 

1) Ask a classroom teacher if they wouldn’t mind including questions on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math in your program.

2) Provide them the STEM Custom Card Download Template

3) The classroom teacher would type his/her questions into the template and email it back to you when completed.

4) You would print the template, laminate it, and add the cards to the already existing question cards that are included with STEM Skillastics®.

5) You have now included real-time questions that classroom teachers are reviewing in the classroom into PE. The classroom teacher will be thrilled and you will love seamlessly integrating more academics into your program.

For more information, contact Jess Wadleigh at jwadleigh@skillastics.com or at (310) 431-8205.

Purchase Speed Stacks Skillastics® TODAY!

Skillastics® & Speed Stacks have joined forces to provide the perfect compliment to your Sport Stacking program!

​The Speed Stacks Skillastics® Activity Kit System lets you teach Sport Stacking using the proven and celebrated Skillastics® method.

The 26 Speed Stack activities reinforce all the skills and knowledge your students need to particpate in this amazing sport while enhancing physical activity, brain development and FUN!

Speed Stacks Skillastics® is NOW available for purchase as a pre-release special price sale!

Take advantage of this amazing price today, and then be one of the first to introduce Speed Stacks Skillastics® into your program in the Fall!

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND ORDER FORM

 

Light the Olympic Torch! Winter Olympic Theme Resources Guaranteed to Inspire Your Students

Can you believe it, the Winter Olympics begin early next month! Even though opening ceremonies are less than a month away, you still have time to knock out some amazing Olympic theme lessons. Here are some ideas;

1) An amazing winter Olympic resource is Bfit4 Winter Skillastics®. This Skillastics® Activity Kit focuses on specific movements that Olympic athletes need to develop in winter sports such as snowboarding, skiing, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing.

With your guidance, students can imagine themselves in the role while they are downhill skiing as they perform lateral jumps, or pretend balancing on a snowboard or holding plank position on their sled as they race down the hill. (All activities included in Bfit4 Winter Skillastics®). The skills will enhance many components of the physically fit student by building strength, flexibility, endurance and balance needed for these winter activities.
It can be played with a fun twist to the traditional game as well by adding a lap of popular winter activities around your gym in between rolls of the die. For example, students might simulate snow shoeing or ice skating (shoe boxes), as well as cross country skiing (old rags), or sledding and the luge run (scooters).


BFit4 Winter Skillastics® is a fun, easy, active and an innovative way to celebrate the Winter Olympics and bring the outdoor world of winter activities into your existing program.
CLICK HERE to share the Bfit4 Winter Skillastics® Experience with your students today! In honor of the Olympics, we are offering a 15% discount. Use code BF418 at our storefront checkout or mention code on purchase order. Offer Expires February 4, 2018.

2) In addition, CLICK HERE for great ideas to recreate Winter Olympic events

5 Reasons Why Skillastics® Will Make Your Program Great

 

Can you imagine your job getting easier, and more productive?  What if you could maximize participation without wasting the limited time you have?  Wouldn’t it be great to have a resource at your disposal guaranteeing a glowing administrative review?

With Skillastics® you can.

The Skillastics® Activity Kit System is a powerful resource that will transform your program. Not Convinced? Following are 5 key reasons why Skillastics® will undeniably make your program great.

1) Increase Academic Learning
A requirement you are constantly hearing from your administration. Skillastics® bridges the gap between physical activity and academics by seamlessly incorporating vocabulary, literacy, math and STEM learning. Skillastics® is an innovative way of including more academic integration.

2) Connecting with Classroom Teachers
What makes Skillastics® stand out beyond any other physical activity resource is its ability to connect directly with classroom teachers through the Skillastics® Custom Question Card Templates for nutrition, STEM and math. Simply share these templates with classroom teachers and ask them to create questions that are relevant to the lessons that they are currently teaching. You would then take these questions and add them to your program while your students are playing Skillastics®. Instant connection!

3) Organized Chaos
The best large group resource available! You will not find a better large group resource out there. Period. Any instructor that is using Skillastics® properly will tell you that the Skillastics® Activity Kit System exceeds their expectations and reinforces all the reasons why they decided to add Skillastics® to their program.

4) Steller Assessment
It is crucial to assess students to make sure they are really learning. If you, your students, parents, and administration truly want to see fitness progression in your class, the Skillastics® Activity Kit System is the most effective resource to measure movement in a variety of ways.

Fully Engaged
Students are full engaged, which frees you up to conduct formative assessment,    measuring all students progress and mastery of skill without interruption.

Effective Feedback
With students fully engaged, Skillastics® provides a more relaxed atmosphere for feedback and individual instruction when needed.

Summative Assessment with Technology
Skillastics® is the most effective resource to measure student outcomes using heart rate monitors or other technology based devices.

5) The Skillastics® Activity Kit System Saves Time
Do you see your student’s once a week? Twice a week if you’re lucky? How many times do you see a new lesson activity that looks like fun, but takes much too long to set up? The innovative Skillastics® technique takes less than a minute to set up and allows for maximum participation while increasing fitness levels.

Introducing the Skillastics® Activity Kit System into your program will exceed your expectations and fulfill all your objectives. Visit www.skillastics.com or email us at info@skillastics.com to transform your program today.

Basketball Tips and Ideas – Focus on the Present

I remember the first time I performed at the halftime of a Boston Celtics game. What a thrill it was to perform on a court with so much history associated with it! When I started the dribbling routine of my performance, my mind started to wander – here I was standing on the Leprechaun, thinking about all the historical games that were started with a jump ball right here. I was thinking completely about something else other than thinking about what I was doing in front of 20,000 people at that moment! I made a slight mistake, which shocked me back into focusing on the present and then I finished the performance successfully.

Have you ever felt your mind wander during an important moment in a game? We’ve all experienced this at one time or another in our lives, and it’s easier said than done to “snap out of it” and get back to focusing on the task at hand. Below are 7 Keys to Staying Focused in the Present:

  1. Refocus – Become aware of the slip of attention, and then choose another focal point or direction of attention to turn your mind to.
  2. Use Task Goals – Concentrate on the specific challenges of the event. This may include technique or strategy points, executing plays, or simply being involved in the game.
  3. Keep it Simple – Do not become overly analytic in your desire to take an “active mind” approach to performance. Do not fill your mind up with so many thoughts.
  4. Plan for the Competition – Planning well in advance of the event involves working out where to focus at different parts of an event. By preparing mental plans in advance, you are free to carry out the plan during performance.
  5. Make Back up Plans – These are developed by preparing responses, or refocusing strategies, to use in adverse competitive situations. Of course, you can’t plan for all possible scenarios, but working out in advance how you would respond can facilitate an appropriate response being made when the “heat is on.”
  6. Practice Concentration – Here is a meditation exercise. Sit in a comfortable position. Take a note of the time on your watch. Close your eyes and focus on one thing (for instance your breathing). Pay attention to your breaths in and out. Do this for as long as you maintain this focus. Open your eyes when your focus moves and note the time on your watch. Continue to try to increase your focus time.
  7. Direct your attention – Dissociate the emotional content from the noise of the crowd. Know that the crowd is there, but don’t let it affect your feelings.

Some information in this tip comes from: Flow in Sports: The Keys to Optimal Experiences and Performances.

Skillastics Soars in After School

Skillastics® Soars in After School

Did you know Skillastics® is the #1 physical resource in After School?  After School sites love its simplicity, versatility, and its alignment with the 5 Core Competencies in Social & Emotional Learning. 

CLICK HERE to Learn how Skillastics® Aligns with the SEL 5 Core Competencies.

More Time Engaging in the Skillastics® System Improves Physical Activity Levels

Spending more time developing fitness skills in physical education classes pays off with more active students at Central Elementary School in Albemarle, N.C. according to research from Pfeiffer University.  Students in Krista Scronce’s physical education classes were able to use the nationally recognized Skillastics®™ system to significantly improve physical activity levels during physical education class time. Physical activity was measured using piezoelectric devices specific to each student. The classes using Skillastics®™ were able to add about two-hundred more steps and spend more than an extra minute in moderate to vigorous activity (MVPA) when compared to other 4th grade physical education classes. Incredibly, this improvement was observed after using Skillastics®™ for a very small portion of the class time. Physical activity is a dependent variable in overall quality of life and positively associated with academic performance (Gill DL et al.2013, Rasberry, CN et al 2011). Meaning, these steps improve student’s health and ability to succeed academically.

All 4th grade students receive fifty minutes of physical education per week in physical education classes at Central Elementary School. The Skillastics®™ system was used for the first ten minutes in half of the 4th grade classes over eight class meetings. All fourth-grade classes received the same instruction taught by Ms. Scronce, except for the ten minutes of Skillastics®. The Skillastics®™ classes were then compared to the other fourth grade classes. Following the eighth class meeting the amount of MVPA significantly increased in the Skillastics®™ groups. “Using the Skillastics® System was easier than I expected and the students appeared to enjoy the short focus on skills” Krista reported. The research is part of an ongoing partnership with the Health and Physical Education Department at Pfeiffer University.

Rasberry, C. N., Lee, S. M., Robin, L., Laris, B., Russell, L. A., Coyle, K. K., & Nihiser, A. J. (2011, 06). The association between school-based physical activity, including physical education, and academic performance: A systematic review of the literature. Preventive Medicine, 52. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.01.027

Gill, D.L., Hammond, C.C., Reifsteck E.J., Jehu, C.M., Williams R.A., Adams, M.M., Lange, E.H., Becofsky, K., Rodriguez, E. & Shang Y.T. (2013). Physical activity and quality of life. Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Suppl 1:S28-34. doi: 10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.S.S28. Epub 2013 Jan 30

Confidence or Arrogance?

There is a distinct difference between confidence and arrogance out on the basketball court.  Confidence is defined as an athlete who is sure of his/her abilities and gets the job done.  She or he knows that basketball is a team game and praises his/her teammates – giving credit where credit is due.  Arrogance is defined as an athlete who is sure of his/her abilities, however taking it one step further.  He or she knows they’re good and makes sure everyone around them knows it too. They are never at fault if the ball is turned over, or the ref makes a call — it’s always someone else’s fault.

I found a poem, by Tom Krause that talks about arrogance and coming to the realization that no matter how good we are, we always have room for improvement.

Just Me
by Tom Krause

From the time I was little, I knew I was great
’cause the people would tell me, “You’ll make it – just wait.”
But they never did tell me how great I would be
If I ever played someone who was greater than me.

When I’m in the back yard, I’m king with the ball
To swish all those baskets is no sweat at all.
But all of a sudden there’s a defender in my face
Who doesn’t seem to realize that I’m king of this place.

So the pressure gets to me; I rush with the ball.
My passes to teammates could go through the wall.
My jumper’s not falling, my dribbles not sure.
My hand is not steady; my eye is not pure.

The fault is my teammates – they don’t understand.
The fault is my coaches – what a terrible plan.
The fault is the call by the blind referee.
But the fault is not mine; I’m the greatest, you see.

Then finally it hit me when I started to see
That the face in the mirror looked exactly like me.
It wasn’t my teammates who were dropping the ball,
and it wasn’t my coach shooting bricks at the wall.

That face in the mirror that was always so great
Had some room for improvement instead of just hate.
So I stopped blaming others and I started to grow.
My play got much better and it started to show.

And all of my teammates didn’t seem quite so bad.
I learned to depend on the good friends I had.
Now I like myself better since I started to see
That I was lousy being great – I’m much better being me.

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